Primary Lens Luxation Call for Samples

Back to Health & Genetics Page

Primary Lens Luxation Call for Samples [Tuesday, May 30, 2006]

Cambridge, UK - Scientists at The Cambridge University Veterinary School and the Animal Health Trust are conducting research to identify the genetic mutation responsible for Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) in various breeds of dog. This is a painful, debilitating and often blinding disease, in which the lens of the eye separates from its attachments and moves within the eye, causing secondary damage and often glaucoma. It is caused by an inherited mutant gene, which we hope to identify to allow subsequent development of a DNA diagnostic test. "Gene mapping" in miniature bull terriers and Ormskirk terriers has made significant progress in the last few months but to speed test development we now need a larger range of samples representing animals affected by PLL from additional breeds.

Drs. Sagan and Mellersh and their respective laboratories require DNA samples (buccal brushings) from dogs affected with PLL and their close relatives. Specifically the following samples are needed from these breeds:

AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG
BEDLINGTON TERRIER
BORDER COLLIE
BRITTANY
CAIRN TERRIER
CHINESE SHAR PEI
DANDY DINMONT TERRIER
FOX TERRIER (BOTH COAT TYPES)
KERRY BLUE TERRIER
MANCHESTER TERRIER
NORWEGIAN ELKHOUND
PARSON RUSSELL TERRIER (AND JACK RUSSELL TERRIERS)
PATTERDALE (OR FELL) TERRIER
SCOTTISH TERRIER
SEALYHAM TERRIER
SKYE TERRIER
TIBETAN TERRIER

In some of these breeds, Primary Lens Luxation is thought to be rare although reported in the veterinary literature. Samples should be buccal (cheek) swabs from PLL affected dogs, parents and grandparents of PLL affected dogs, and brothers and sisters of PLL affected dogs.

A 5-generation pedigree and a copy of the dog's latest eye certificate should accompany all samples. It is also very important that we informed if the dog undergoes significant eye health changes after the sample has been submitted. The research is conducted on a confidential basis and results from individual dogs are not disclosed. From time to time we may share samples with bona fide researchers from other research institutions to contribute to collaborative and complementary research studies but participation in those studies is always confidential.

To send DNA samples, or for more information about this research, or to obtain brush kits, please contact:

Dr David Sargan
Department of Veterinary Medicine
Cambridge University
Madingley Road
Cambridge CB3 0ES UK
Email: drs20 @ cam. ac .uk

 

Copyright 1998-2006 Tibetan Terrier Club of America
Privacy Policy | For Comments: ttwebmaster | Feedback
Last updated: 11 June 2006